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Long-term, deep-ocean test of concrete spherical structures results after 6 years by H. H. Haynes

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Published by Civil Engineering Laboratory, Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme, Calif .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Harvey H. Haynes and Roy S. Highberg ; sponsored by Naval Facilities Engineering Command
SeriesTechnical report -- R-869
ContributionsHighberg, Roy S., United States. Naval Facilities Engineering Command
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 51 p. :
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24390756M
OCLC/WorldCa11322421

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TY - BOOK TI - Long-term deep-ocean test of concrete spherical structures. fabrication, emplacement, and initial inspection Part I: UR - PB - Civil Engineering Laboratory, Naval Construction Battalion Center, CY - Port Hueneme, Calif.: PY - N1 - Cover title. "March ".   In , a long-term, deep-ocean test was started on eighteen concrete spheres, 66 inches (1, mm) in outside diameter by 4,12 inches ( mm) in wall thickness. The spheres were placed in the ocean at depths from 1, to 5, feet ( to 1, m).Author: Harvey H Haynes, Roy S Highberg. Long-term, deep-ocean test of concrete spherical structures: results after 6 years / By H. H. Haynes, Roy S. Highberg and United States. Naval Facilities Engineering Command. Long-term, deep-ocean test of concrete spherical structures: results after 6 years / by Harvey H. Haynes and Roy S. Highberg ; sponsored by Naval Facilities Engineering Command.

Abstract: In , a long-term, deep-ocean test was started on 18 pressure-resistant, hollow concrete spheres, 66 inches in outside diameter by inches in wall thickness. The spheres were placed in the ocean near the seafloor at depths from 1, to 5, feet. A long-term laboratory study has investigated how cement-type, aggregate-type and curing, affect the susceptibility of concrete to the thaumasite form of sulfate attack (TSA). Previous studies in the s and s had reported excessive expansion and extensive deterioration in concrete structures Considering the long-term Deep-Ocean Test of Concrete Spherical. In , a long-term, deep-ocean test was started on 18 pressure-resistant, hollow concrete spheres, 66 inches in outside diameter by inches in wall thickness. The spheres were placed in the ocean near the seafloor at depths from 1, to 5, feet. over a year period, annual inspections of the spheres using submersibles have provided data on time-dependent failure and reliability.

Long-Term, Deep Ocean Test of Concrete Spherical Structures - Results After 6 Years, by H.H. Haynes and R. S. Highberg, Technical Report R, Civil Engineering Laboratory, NCBC, Port Hueneme, CA, , p.   stresses in concrete structures. Furthermore, concrete shrink as it dries under ambient conditions. Tensile stresses occur when free shrinkage is restrained. The combination of high tensile stresses with low fracture resistance of concrete often results in cracking. This cracking reduces the durability of a concrete structure. Technical Report R Long-term deep-ocean test of concrete spherical structures - Results after 6 years, by H. H. Haynes. Port Hueneme, Calif., Jan , p. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Non-destructive evaluation of reinforced concrete structures, Volume 2: Non-destructive testing methods is a standard reference for civil and structural engineers as well as those concerned with making decisions regarding the safety of reinforced concrete structures.